Saturday, May 26, 2007

Idar-Oberstein #2

I'll try and get another post or two about Idar-Oberstein in before my trip to Helsinki tomorrow morning. I want to post more about the conference but it will come later.

There were quite a few exhibitions on during the conference including this wonderful installation in the entrance hall of the school...

the artist-in-residence exhibition

the artist-in-residence exhibition

if you look closely you can see that some of the drawers and shelves contain the works. (there are bigger versions of all my photos on flickr, just click on the photo to go there). These photos were taken during set up so it's not finished but you get the idea.

Now, I don't normally like installations that take attention away from the works themselves but I really liked this.

This is another issue that has been the focus of discussions between myself and my Estonian jewellery brethren as it is the practice here to create an 'atmosphere' using techniques of lighting, sound and surface when exhibiting. Even in an assessment situation, the students frequently employ very low lighting, recorded sounds or music and display works on felt and fabric. I find this distracting but their argument is that it all adds to the 'reading' of the work. When I exhibit, I think very carefully about how the work will be displayed and, where possible, avoid glass covered plinths! The composition and placement of objects in exhibitions is very important to me and, while I have a preference for white surfaces, I have recently displayed work on pale blue silk. But generally, I try and avoid distracting installation techniques.

So, why did I like the exhibition above? Because of the reference to the work. It was a group show of works by all the artists who had taken part in the school's artist-in-residence program. All of the pieces of furniture had been removed from the Villa Bengel which is where the participating artists live and work. The Villa Bengel is the subject of another post to come but briefly, it is a heritage protected 'Bijouteriewaren and clock chain factory' (I think that means jewellery factory, anyone?) with worker accommodation which has been bequeathed to the school for the use of the residency program. Now Villa Bengel is old. And Villa Bengel is somewhere that you want to explore. And this installation made me want to explore and find the pieces of jewellery within the labyrinth of disused furniture and factory shelving. It was designed by Tabea Reulecke who is the assistant at the school and is also a maker of beautiful things....

close fight (object/

'close fight' (object)


Sorry, so much writing!! Here are some images of works from the exhibition...

Karin Seufert
Karin Seufert whose work I love and have already blogged about here


Karin Seufert
Karin Seufert


Bety K. Majernikova
Bety K. Majernikova


There was much more but, because of the installation, it was difficult to photograph. So here are some images of work by the students of the school which were also on display.


installation at the school
display cases in the hall


Kirsten Bak
Kirsten Bak - they're plastic coated hollowed branches and they're rings (and I bought one)


Martina Palstring
Martina Palstring


Martina Palstring
Martina Palstring

more again soon

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2 comments:

kait said...

I love the rings by Kirsten Bak. They're beautiful!

Rebecca-the-Wrecker said...

the dispay cases are sooo groovy! i love these works as well and think that creative ways of displaying art that use more of our senses should be explored. but if work is made for the human body that should not be forgotten unless there is a more overpowering reason to display in a particular way. I saw jewellery displayed in fish tanks once - i cannot recall why it was displayed this way but thought it was a trifle silly at the time. although the magnifying effect of water could be an advantage when selling work made of precious materials! Actually I think anything is preferable to those horrible glass/perspex covered plinths alot of galleries favour as the one size fits all approach to dealing with small precious object display!